Shear Madness Challenge #3, “Clean-up in Aisle 10!” Winners

Shear-Madness logo

We had a smaller group of entries for what was admittedly a difficult challenge for Challenge #3.  They were all unique and fun entries and the judges did an excellent job with them.  A big thank you to our wonderful judges:  Gail Wolfenden-Steib, Caitlin Shindler and Lis Kester!

And here are the winners:

Honorable Mention:  ”1874 Bustle” by Leah Lloyd!

The bustle and some of the fabulous things it has been worn under!

The bustle and some of the fabulous things it has been worn under!

Leah says: I made an 1874 bustle from muslin and palette wrap. It’s steel strapping, with the tips wrapped in duct tape. Later, I realized that muslin was not the best choice, but the occasional repair at a stress point and I am good to go again! (Also includes photos of the bustle being worn with various gowns to show movement and structure.). ·

Judges’ comments:

“Great shape on the bustle and the dresses are gorgeous!”

“The bustle gives a really nice, solid shape. I wish we could judge on the gowns as well, because that polka dot and check confection is splendid!”

“Very solidly built bustle. Nice job. Did you use multiple layers of the tape or a wider version? Just curious–I have used the material before but your pictures look like you found a heavier duty material. Love the costumes on top!”

Congrats Leah!

Third Place:  ”3D Maneuver Gear Anime Cosplay” by Lisa Hansen!

Lisa's costumes, the inspiration photo and some of the many pieces that went into the making of them.

Lisa’s costumes, the inspiration photo and some of the many pieces that went into the making of them.

Lisa says:  I DO realize that the goal of this challenge is to make clothing out of things that aren’t fabric. I had something in mind but no time, HOWEVER, I did make cosplay gear for my kids. These things are called 3D maneuver gear in the anime/manga. They are supposed to allow the user to ‘Spider-man’ around to kill Titan (who eat people. The ones I made have NO metal in them at all except one tiny washer. And it’s purely a decorative washer. This was my most extreme ‘arts and crafts’ project yet, and I didn’t use anyone’s advice on how to make it. Here’s a picture of the anime, and a couple pictures of my version. A better description is on my blog.http://idlehandsthems-fitsworkshop.blogspot.com/2014/06/attack-on-titanshingeki-no-kyojin.html#more

Judges’ comments:

“Great use of materials here– those barrels on their backs came out particularly well!”

“I’m impressed with how closely the costumes match the original picture. Really great job of using lots of different items and techniques to achieve the required look.”

“The cylinders really do look metallic. Nice job overall on the construction.  Resourceful alternative to metal.”

Congrats Lisa!

Second Place:  ”Dragon Costume with Collapsible Wings” by Paige Cavanagh Mattern!

The finished costume, the amazing headpiece and part of the construction of the wingpack.

The finished costume, the amazing headpiece and part of the construction of the wingpack.

Paige says:  My husband and I made a dragon costume. He did the frame work and I did the coverings. The frame is made from a back pack, tail is aluminium stock, wing frames from pvc pipe. Insulation pipe covers the armature, Halloween pumpkin teeth are used for the spikes. Stretch nylon fabric wings with glow in the dark glue for veins, Outdoor rechargeable lights on the wings. Chest, arms and legs are dragon scale nagahide fabric.
We have been working on this over the last several months and it is finally complete.

Judges’ comments:

“The wingspan is really impressive the rechargeable lights are a great touch!”

“Impressive workmanship – love the creative use of materials like the pumpkin teeth spikes.”

“The armature looks very well made and thought out. The insulation on it really helps bulk out a much thinner material and was a nice choice. I really wish a video was part of the materials. I would love to see how the finished costume moved. The chest piece is nifty too.”

Congrats Paige!

First Place:  ”18th Century Francaise Tornado from the Wizard of Oz” by Jessica Frantal!

The amazing light-up Tornado francaise and spinning wig!  Photos courtesy of C. Mak.

The amazing light-up Tornado francaise and spinning wig! Photos courtesy of C. Mak.

Jessica says: This francaise was designed to represent the Tornado in an 18th century Wizard of Oz group. Almost everything was made from scratch, including the fabric of the gown and the wig. Non-fabric-store materials include:
4 pounds of wool roving which was hand-dyed and turned into felt, 350 high powered LEDs connected to an Arduino microprocessor with 150 feet of electric train wire to create the lightning effects, Fiberglass, styrene, aluminum tubing, a floral wreath wire form, aluminum sculpture mesh, polycarbonate sheet, a high torque micro motor, small radial bearings and a robot track wheel kit were combined to create the support system for the spinning tornado wig.

Judges’ comments:

“Really stunning– the pattern she achieved in the fabric is beautiful, and the engineering required for that wig is extremely impressive. This is one I’d love to see in person!”

“That wig is truly a work of genius. I’m blown away by how many different objects and techniques went into making it. If there’s a video of it in operation, I’d love to see it!”

“Having seen this one in person I have to reiterate the ‘wow!’ factor. The level of construction was stunning. Your work with felting and lighting was superb. The circling cows are one of my personal favorite costume details that I have seen in any masquerade. All the requirements of the challenge were met in the entry. Love it!”

Congrats Jessica!

Thank you to everyone for making Challenge #3 such a success!  We are looking forward to seeing what you can come up with for Challenge #4!

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s